Rob JanawayChange photo
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  • Archaeological Sciences,
    University of Bradford,
    Richmond Road,
    Bradford,
    West Yorkshire,
    United Kingdom,
    BD7 1DP
  • +44 (0) 7771501957
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  • Rob is Lecturer in Forensic and Archaeological Sciences at the University of Bradford. He has more than 35 years experience of Archaeology in both the field and the laboratory. He originally qualified in Archaeological Conservation and specialised in the relationship between materials degradation and depositional environments. He has worked on a range archaeological sites including peat bogs, desert sites, and deep stratified urban deposits. He is a specialist on the tap... moreedit
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Since the landmark excavation at Christchurch Spitalfields, interest in post-medieval burial archaeology has grown substantially. In the past five years, over 5000 post-medieval burials have been excavated in London alone. Concurrently,... more
Since the landmark excavation at Christchurch Spitalfields, interest in post-medieval burial archaeology has grown substantially. In the past five years, over 5000 post-medieval burials have been excavated in London alone. Concurrently, public interest in our recent past increased, as shown by the popularity of programmes such as ‘Who do you think you are?’. Yet legal, ethical and practical constraints determine that assemblages are often reburied, limiting the archaeologist’s ability to achieve the research potential of the burial resource, or are exhumed in a non-archaeological manner. There is an undeniable danger of losing irreplaceable information which may be unlocked through research on human remains and associated grave goods, textiles and coffin furniture, using recently adopted and minimally invasive techniques such as biochemical analysis, 3D laser scanning and computed radiography. This situation needs to be addressed by the creation of a rigorous, long-term research framework which can optimise academic research, and inform excavation and analysis. Coupled with new ways of engaging with the public in a challenging way, to provide an holistic picture of the past. As full-economic costing has widened the gap between commercial archaeology and the higher education sector, this paper discusses how a consortium approach, involving traditionally separate disciplines and other stakeholders can create such a strategy.
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